Pagan king (gods and kings book 2) - Anglo-Saxon paganism - Wikipedia



Norse mythology takes you on a spectacular journey, as tales from the two main groups that form the mythology of northern and eastern Europe unfold. The gods and frost giants are destined to face each other on the battlefield at Ragnarok, the doom of the Germanic gods, the catastrophic fight to the death that is to take place on the Vigrid Plain. The world will end to “rise again out of the water, fair and green,” as it is reborn.

Doing battle alongside powerful Odin and the gods, were the Einherjar (“the heroic dead”), men killed in battle and taken to Valhalla. Once there they were restored to life, in order to form Odin’s army against the enemy, the frost giants. Ready to lead and fight at Ragnarok was the fire god Loki, along with the frost giants, and the “unworthy dead”, warriors taken from Hel (the Germanic netherworld). Loki’s daughter ruled over Hel, and she was named Hel. Loki’s other children, Fenrir the ferocious wolf, and Jormungand the monstrous sea serpent, also fought alongside Loki and the frost giants at Ragnarok.

AEGIR , was a Germanic sea god, husband of Ran and father of nine daughters called the waves. He lived under the ocean and rose only to cause the destruction of ships and their crew. To ensure a safe voyage, prisoners were sacrificed to Aegir.

The very proud Aegir hated being told what to do, so when Thor ordered him to brew ale for the gods he pretended that he would not be able to perform the task because he didn’t have a large enough cauldron. Undaunted, Thor procured an enormous cauldron from the frost giant Hymir, so humiliated was Aegir he had no choice but to accept the task and supply the home of the gods, Asgard, with the ale that was demanded.

At the subsequent gathering of the gods during their celebration, the sinister Loki stabbed Fimafeng, Aegir’s servant.

THE AESIR , were one branch of the family of the gods, the other branch was the Vanir, at one point a war between Aesir and Vanir which ended peacefully showed Aesir to be the dominant one. They were both glad to end the war, to ensure peace some of the leading Aesir went to live among the Vanir and some important Vanir went to live among the Aesir in Asgard.

PA'GAN, n. L. paganus, a peasant or countryman, from pagus, a village. A heathen a Gentile an idolater one who worships false gods. This word was originally applied to the inhabitants of the country, who on the first propagation of the christian religion adhered to the worship of false gods, or refused to receive christianity, after it had been received by the inhabitants of the cities. In like manner, heather signifies an inhabitant of the heath or woods, and caffer, in Arabic, signifies the inhabitant of a hut or cottage, and one that does not receive the religion of Mohammed. Pagan is used to distinguish one from a Christian and a Mohammedan.

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Norse mythology takes you on a spectacular journey, as tales from the two main groups that form the mythology of northern and eastern Europe unfold. The gods and frost giants are destined to face each other on the battlefield at Ragnarok, the doom of the Germanic gods, the catastrophic fight to the death that is to take place on the Vigrid Plain. The world will end to “rise again out of the water, fair and green,” as it is reborn.

Doing battle alongside powerful Odin and the gods, were the Einherjar (“the heroic dead”), men killed in battle and taken to Valhalla. Once there they were restored to life, in order to form Odin’s army against the enemy, the frost giants. Ready to lead and fight at Ragnarok was the fire god Loki, along with the frost giants, and the “unworthy dead”, warriors taken from Hel (the Germanic netherworld). Loki’s daughter ruled over Hel, and she was named Hel. Loki’s other children, Fenrir the ferocious wolf, and Jormungand the monstrous sea serpent, also fought alongside Loki and the frost giants at Ragnarok.

AEGIR , was a Germanic sea god, husband of Ran and father of nine daughters called the waves. He lived under the ocean and rose only to cause the destruction of ships and their crew. To ensure a safe voyage, prisoners were sacrificed to Aegir.

The very proud Aegir hated being told what to do, so when Thor ordered him to brew ale for the gods he pretended that he would not be able to perform the task because he didn’t have a large enough cauldron. Undaunted, Thor procured an enormous cauldron from the frost giant Hymir, so humiliated was Aegir he had no choice but to accept the task and supply the home of the gods, Asgard, with the ale that was demanded.

At the subsequent gathering of the gods during their celebration, the sinister Loki stabbed Fimafeng, Aegir’s servant.

THE AESIR , were one branch of the family of the gods, the other branch was the Vanir, at one point a war between Aesir and Vanir which ended peacefully showed Aesir to be the dominant one. They were both glad to end the war, to ensure peace some of the leading Aesir went to live among the Vanir and some important Vanir went to live among the Aesir in Asgard.

Norse mythology takes you on a spectacular journey, as tales from the two main groups that form the mythology of northern and eastern Europe unfold. The gods and frost giants are destined to face each other on the battlefield at Ragnarok, the doom of the Germanic gods, the catastrophic fight to the death that is to take place on the Vigrid Plain. The world will end to “rise again out of the water, fair and green,” as it is reborn.

Doing battle alongside powerful Odin and the gods, were the Einherjar (“the heroic dead”), men killed in battle and taken to Valhalla. Once there they were restored to life, in order to form Odin’s army against the enemy, the frost giants. Ready to lead and fight at Ragnarok was the fire god Loki, along with the frost giants, and the “unworthy dead”, warriors taken from Hel (the Germanic netherworld). Loki’s daughter ruled over Hel, and she was named Hel. Loki’s other children, Fenrir the ferocious wolf, and Jormungand the monstrous sea serpent, also fought alongside Loki and the frost giants at Ragnarok.

AEGIR , was a Germanic sea god, husband of Ran and father of nine daughters called the waves. He lived under the ocean and rose only to cause the destruction of ships and their crew. To ensure a safe voyage, prisoners were sacrificed to Aegir.

The very proud Aegir hated being told what to do, so when Thor ordered him to brew ale for the gods he pretended that he would not be able to perform the task because he didn’t have a large enough cauldron. Undaunted, Thor procured an enormous cauldron from the frost giant Hymir, so humiliated was Aegir he had no choice but to accept the task and supply the home of the gods, Asgard, with the ale that was demanded.

At the subsequent gathering of the gods during their celebration, the sinister Loki stabbed Fimafeng, Aegir’s servant.

THE AESIR , were one branch of the family of the gods, the other branch was the Vanir, at one point a war between Aesir and Vanir which ended peacefully showed Aesir to be the dominant one. They were both glad to end the war, to ensure peace some of the leading Aesir went to live among the Vanir and some important Vanir went to live among the Aesir in Asgard.

PA'GAN, n. L. paganus, a peasant or countryman, from pagus, a village. A heathen a Gentile an idolater one who worships false gods. This word was originally applied to the inhabitants of the country, who on the first propagation of the christian religion adhered to the worship of false gods, or refused to receive christianity, after it had been received by the inhabitants of the cities. In like manner, heather signifies an inhabitant of the heath or woods, and caffer, in Arabic, signifies the inhabitant of a hut or cottage, and one that does not receive the religion of Mohammed. Pagan is used to distinguish one from a Christian and a Mohammedan.




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