Don't eat that - DON T EAT THAT!! - YouTube



If the prescription label says “take with meals,” does it matter what you eat? I currently take eight different medications for various health problems and would like to know if there are any foods I need to avoid.

It depends on the medication. Many meds should be taken with food – any food – to increase their absorption and reduce the risk of side effects. But some foods and medications can interact, reducing the medications’ effectiveness or increasing the risk of harmful side effects.

To stay safe, you should always talk to your doctor or pharmacist to learn the ins and outs of your prescriptions, along with what foods and beverages to avoid while you’re on it. In the meantime, here are some foods you should stay away from for some commonly prescribed drugs.

Cholesterol Medications: If you take a certain statin drug to control high cholesterol like Liptor, Zocor, Altoprev, Mevacor, or generics atorvastatin, simvastatin or lovastatin, you should avoid grapefruit and grapefruit juice. Grapefruit can raise the level of the drug in your bloodstream and increase the risk of side effects, especially leg pain.

Blood Pressure Medicine: If you take an ACE inhibitor drug like Capoten, Vasotec, Monopril, Zestril and others to lower your blood pressure, you should limit food that contain potassium like bananas, oranges, tomatoes, spinach and other leafy greens, sweet potatoes, and salt substitutes that contain potassium. ACE inhibitors raise the body’s potassium levels. Eating too many potassium rich-foods while taking an ACE inhibitor can cause an irregular heartbeat and heart palpitations.

Blood Thinning Medications: If you are taking Coumadin, Jantoven, or the generic warfarin, you should limit kale and other greens, including broccoli, cabbage, spinach, and brussels sprouts that contain vitamin K. These foods can block the effects of these blood-thinning medications putting you at risk for developing blood clots. You also need to watch out for garlic, ginger, vitamin E and fish oil supplements because they can increase these medications blood-thinning abilities putting you at risk for excessive bleeding.

If the prescription label says “take with meals,” does it matter what you eat? I currently take eight different medications for various health problems and would like to know if there are any foods I need to avoid.

It depends on the medication. Many meds should be taken with food – any food – to increase their absorption and reduce the risk of side effects. But some foods and medications can interact, reducing the medications’ effectiveness or increasing the risk of harmful side effects.

To stay safe, you should always talk to your doctor or pharmacist to learn the ins and outs of your prescriptions, along with what foods and beverages to avoid while you’re on it. In the meantime, here are some foods you should stay away from for some commonly prescribed drugs.

Cholesterol Medications: If you take a certain statin drug to control high cholesterol like Liptor, Zocor, Altoprev, Mevacor, or generics atorvastatin, simvastatin or lovastatin, you should avoid grapefruit and grapefruit juice. Grapefruit can raise the level of the drug in your bloodstream and increase the risk of side effects, especially leg pain.

Blood Pressure Medicine: If you take an ACE inhibitor drug like Capoten, Vasotec, Monopril, Zestril and others to lower your blood pressure, you should limit food that contain potassium like bananas, oranges, tomatoes, spinach and other leafy greens, sweet potatoes, and salt substitutes that contain potassium. ACE inhibitors raise the body’s potassium levels. Eating too many potassium rich-foods while taking an ACE inhibitor can cause an irregular heartbeat and heart palpitations.

Blood Thinning Medications: If you are taking Coumadin, Jantoven, or the generic warfarin, you should limit kale and other greens, including broccoli, cabbage, spinach, and brussels sprouts that contain vitamin K. These foods can block the effects of these blood-thinning medications putting you at risk for developing blood clots. You also need to watch out for garlic, ginger, vitamin E and fish oil supplements because they can increase these medications blood-thinning abilities putting you at risk for excessive bleeding.

Yesterday, we talked about What to Look For on an Ingredient List . For those who like to examine food labels really carefully, there's a new iPhone app that helps decipher over 1,500 food additives and ingredients and lets you know whether they might be carcinogenic, genetically modified, a known allergen, or otherwise unhealthy.

The app is bare bones, aesthetically, but it's quick and easy to use and contains a wealth of information to help consumers understand labels and make informed decisions. To build the app's database, developer Dwayne Ratleff culled information from the Food and Drug Administration, European Food Safety Agency, Food Standards Australia New Zealand, World Health Organization, American Cancer Society, Center For Science In The Public Interest, Celiac.com, and other organizations.

Apartment Therapy Media makes every effort to test and review products fairly and transparently. The views expressed in this review are the personal views of the reviewer and this particular product review was not sponsored or paid for in any way by the manufacturer or an agent working on their behalf.




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