Past reason hated an inspector banks mystery - Past Reason Hated: An Inspector Banks Novel (Inspector.



“After nearly thirty years of reading thousands of mysteries and thrillers, I’ve come up with my three favorites…and the latest [is] from Canadian author Peter Robinson, Past Reason Hated.” The Times, St Petersburg

“Robinson’s got police procedure down pat, and he always manages to come up with an intriguing cast of characters, a skilfully crafted plot, and a climax that’s as surprising as it is satisfying.” Booklist

“Intelligent, insightful and thoroughly compelling, this latest Inspector Banks novel just might convince you that the British really do write a better mystery. In the impeccable tradition of P.D. James and Elizabeth George, Peter Robinson’s latest work makes for fascinating reading….This book should come with a warning label that Robinson’s novels are habit forming. If you weren’t a fan of his before you pick up this book, you’re guaranteed to become one by its exciting conclusion.” West Coast Review of Books, Art, and Entertainment

“Robinson writes the classic mystery, hewing to the time-honored format but managing also to keep the proceedings contemporary and fresh, largely through the creation of convincing and complex characters.” San Diego Union-Tribune

“Robinson…creates an appealing Yorkshire setting with evocative descriptions of the wintry town, dales and seaside.” Publishers Weekly

“A steady, cleareyed revelation of Caroline’s personality, combined with piercing insight into an unusually generous circle of suspects.” Kirkus Reviews

“After nearly thirty years of reading thousands of mysteries and thrillers, I’ve come up with my three favorites…and the latest [is] from Canadian author Peter Robinson, Past Reason Hated.” The Times, St Petersburg

“Robinson’s got police procedure down pat, and he always manages to come up with an intriguing cast of characters, a skilfully crafted plot, and a climax that’s as surprising as it is satisfying.” Booklist

“Intelligent, insightful and thoroughly compelling, this latest Inspector Banks novel just might convince you that the British really do write a better mystery. In the impeccable tradition of P.D. James and Elizabeth George, Peter Robinson’s latest work makes for fascinating reading….This book should come with a warning label that Robinson’s novels are habit forming. If you weren’t a fan of his before you pick up this book, you’re guaranteed to become one by its exciting conclusion.” West Coast Review of Books, Art, and Entertainment

“Robinson writes the classic mystery, hewing to the time-honored format but managing also to keep the proceedings contemporary and fresh, largely through the creation of convincing and complex characters.” San Diego Union-Tribune

“Robinson…creates an appealing Yorkshire setting with evocative descriptions of the wintry town, dales and seaside.” Publishers Weekly

“A steady, cleareyed revelation of Caroline’s personality, combined with piercing insight into an unusually generous circle of suspects.” Kirkus Reviews

The expense of spirit in a waste of shame
Is lust in action; and till action, lust
Is perjur’d, murderous, bloody, full of blame,
Savage, extreme, rude, cruel, not to trust;
Enjoy’d no sooner but despised straight;
Past reason hunted; and no sooner had,
Past reason hated, as a swallow’d bait,
On purpose laid to make the taker mad:
Mad in pursuit, and in possession so;
Had, having, and in quest to have, extreme;
A bliss in proof, and prov’d, a very woe;
Before, a joy propos’d; behind, a dream.
All this the world well knows; yet none knows well
To shun the heaven that leads men to this hell.

Sonnet 129 is one of the 154 sonnets written by William Shakespeare. The 154 sonnets are typically divided between the "Fair Youth" sonnets (1–126) and the "Dark Lady" sonnets (127–152). There is no evidence that this division follows the chronology of the sonnets. The composition date is unknown but it was published along with the rest of the sonnets in the 1609 Quarto .

Sonnet 129 is an English or Shakespearean sonnet . The English sonnet has three quatrains , followed by a final rhyming couplet . It follows the typical rhyme scheme of the form abab cdcd efef gg and is composed in iambic pentameter , a type of poetic metre based on five pairs of metrically weak/strong syllabic positions. The 8th line exemplifies a regular iambic pentameter:

The stressed nonictus "rude" increases the heaviness of the list. An initial reversal is also found in line 9; mid-line reversals potentially occur in lines 9 and 14.

The meter demands a few variant pronunciations: line 3's "murderous" functions as two syllables, line 5's "despised" as three, and line 14's "heaven" as one. [3]

The first quatrain in 129 generally has two scholarly views, the first of which seems more apparent where Shakespeare is writing about his self-hate. "Th'expense of spirit in a waste of shame' ... reads like a poem of self-condemnation for the poet's subjugation to sexual desire". [ attribution needed ] [8] Shakespeare was aware of the consequences of giving into desire and the "murderous, bloody, full of blame" dark feelings that would inevitably follow. [ citation needed ]




517Nm8xwIEL