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To say that a volcano is devastating would be a curious observation.  Of course it is!  It is a volcano!  On our curious planet alone we have hundreds if not thousands littering the land and seas and they have been erupting for billions of years and they will continue to do so for many more years.  There really isn’t anything we can do to avoid one and as history has taught us, some have shaped our very societies for both the better and worse.  I will not go into great detail of each of these curious and wonderful natural creations but I will simply explain just how curious each is since each one has a curious personality.

I know that these are not all of the volcanoes we know of but I might be encouraged to do a second installment if anyone has more suggestions.  Until then, enjoy curiously!

Etna has erupted over 200 times since 1500 BC.  Some of the lava can be dated to as far back as 300,000 years or more.  This is where scientists have tested robots for Mars (ironic since they thought this was the home of Vulcan and it erupting was him making weapons for Mars) since the atmosphere is similar.

It is said that when Tambora erupted in 1815, the sound was heard in Sumatra over 1200 miles away.  The smoke from the mountain was seen as far away as Europe and it lead to a summerless year around the world.

This island has two very active volcanoes, Mt Benbow and Mt. Marum.  Both are large calderas with flowing and bubbling lava and in order to see them you need permission from the chief.  The island was discovered by Captain Cook and is called the “black island” because of all the volcanic ash.

This used to be a volcano called Mount Mazama that collapsed and then became dormant.  The water in the caldera lake is very pure and has a unique friend.  The Old Man In the Lake is a large tree stump that has been curiously bobbing about vertically in the water for almost 200 years without rotting or turning on it’s side.

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To say that a volcano is devastating would be a curious observation.  Of course it is!  It is a volcano!  On our curious planet alone we have hundreds if not thousands littering the land and seas and they have been erupting for billions of years and they will continue to do so for many more years.  There really isn’t anything we can do to avoid one and as history has taught us, some have shaped our very societies for both the better and worse.  I will not go into great detail of each of these curious and wonderful natural creations but I will simply explain just how curious each is since each one has a curious personality.

I know that these are not all of the volcanoes we know of but I might be encouraged to do a second installment if anyone has more suggestions.  Until then, enjoy curiously!

Etna has erupted over 200 times since 1500 BC.  Some of the lava can be dated to as far back as 300,000 years or more.  This is where scientists have tested robots for Mars (ironic since they thought this was the home of Vulcan and it erupting was him making weapons for Mars) since the atmosphere is similar.

It is said that when Tambora erupted in 1815, the sound was heard in Sumatra over 1200 miles away.  The smoke from the mountain was seen as far away as Europe and it lead to a summerless year around the world.

This island has two very active volcanoes, Mt Benbow and Mt. Marum.  Both are large calderas with flowing and bubbling lava and in order to see them you need permission from the chief.  The island was discovered by Captain Cook and is called the “black island” because of all the volcanic ash.

This used to be a volcano called Mount Mazama that collapsed and then became dormant.  The water in the caldera lake is very pure and has a unique friend.  The Old Man In the Lake is a large tree stump that has been curiously bobbing about vertically in the water for almost 200 years without rotting or turning on it’s side.




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