Persistence of vision color llc - The Persistence of Vision



Persistence of Vision is a 2012 documentary film based on Richard Williams ' experiences trying to get The Thief and the Cobbler made. The film was directed by filmmaker Kevin Schreck. Its tagline is, "the untold story of the greatest animated film never made." The film premiered in Canada on 4 October 2012 at the Vancouver International Film Festival.

Animator Richard Williams attempts to finish his masterpiece, a long-term vanity project called The Thief and the Cobbler . Though he did not participate in the making of the film, archival footage of Williams is combined with interviews with his co-workers.

Drew Taylor of IndieWire called the film "a heartbreaking account" and a "Herculean accomplishment". [1] The Globe and Mail rated the film 3.5/4 stars and called the film "gripping". [2] Jeff Shannon of The Seattle Times rated the film 3.5/4 stars and described it as "engrossing" and "surprisingly suspenseful". [3]

Гладиатор (2000)
# 46 on IMDb Top Rated Movies »

Michelle Williams »
# 72 on STARmeter

A look at the first years of Pixar Animation Studios - from the success of "Toy Story" and Pixar's promotion of talented people, to the building of its East Bay campus, the company's ... See full summary  »

The story of the Disney Renaissance, an incredibly prolific, successful and prestigious decade lasting from 1984 to 1994 that saw the fallen Walt Disney Animation Studios' unexpected progressive triumphant return to excellence.

Sting 's wife Trudie Styler documents the turbulent bureaucracy both Sting and the filmmakers went through in order to complete Похождения императора (2000), a Disney film that underwent extensive storyline changes from start to finish.

Taking place 2,400 years in the past, Prologue depicts a brutal battle between two teams of Spartan and Athenian warriors.

Persistence of Vision is a 2012 documentary film based on Richard Williams ' experiences trying to get The Thief and the Cobbler made. The film was directed by filmmaker Kevin Schreck. Its tagline is, "the untold story of the greatest animated film never made." The film premiered in Canada on 4 October 2012 at the Vancouver International Film Festival.

Animator Richard Williams attempts to finish his masterpiece, a long-term vanity project called The Thief and the Cobbler . Though he did not participate in the making of the film, archival footage of Williams is combined with interviews with his co-workers.

Drew Taylor of IndieWire called the film "a heartbreaking account" and a "Herculean accomplishment". [1] The Globe and Mail rated the film 3.5/4 stars and called the film "gripping". [2] Jeff Shannon of The Seattle Times rated the film 3.5/4 stars and described it as "engrossing" and "surprisingly suspenseful". [3]

Гладиатор (2000)
# 46 on IMDb Top Rated Movies »

Michelle Williams »
# 72 on STARmeter

A look at the first years of Pixar Animation Studios - from the success of "Toy Story" and Pixar's promotion of talented people, to the building of its East Bay campus, the company's ... See full summary  »

The story of the Disney Renaissance, an incredibly prolific, successful and prestigious decade lasting from 1984 to 1994 that saw the fallen Walt Disney Animation Studios' unexpected progressive triumphant return to excellence.

Sting 's wife Trudie Styler documents the turbulent bureaucracy both Sting and the filmmakers went through in order to complete Похождения императора (2000), a Disney film that underwent extensive storyline changes from start to finish.

Taking place 2,400 years in the past, Prologue depicts a brutal battle between two teams of Spartan and Athenian warriors.

Let's all be honest, animation works like magic. You're a wizard of the page. How does animation work though? Let's break it down into some detail so we can understand what dark arts we are drawing upon.

The prevailing idea for a long time was the persistence of vision was the reason animation worked. While it is partially true, now we understand that there is more in play than simply just persistence of vision.

Persistence of vision is the fact that your eyes seem to retain an image for a split second after the image has vanished from your view. It's kind of like when you look out a window on a sunny day and close your eyes real tight, you can still kind of see the basic shapes of what you were looking at. It's not that same exact principle since that has to do with light more and your retinas readjusting to the dark, but it's the same idea.

Remember those old bird and cage toys? Like this one that Johnny Depp's mom shows him in Sleepy Hollow.  Those are called thaumatropes. Don't worry that won't be on the final exam, those work by the principle of persistence of vision. Your eye retains that there is both a bird and a cage slightly after they switch images, causing the illusion that the bird is inside the cage when really they are two separate pictures.

Now in animation, we have a series of images that string together to make a movement. For a long time, people presumed it was because of the persistence of vision, that our mind would retain the frame for a split second as we blended it with the new frame to create the movement.

So you know when you're walking down the street and you blink and you're like; "Whoa, where did everything go?!" No? Well, that's good cause that'd be a huge pain and very scary. Luckily for us, our brain ignores all of those blinks so we don't constantly see a flash of black every few seconds.  A film camera works very similarly to a human eye , it has a rolling shutter that blocks out the picture while the image is changing. That way we only see the full frames and not any weird half frames as the film advances.

Persistence of Vision is a 2012 documentary film based on Richard Williams ' experiences trying to get The Thief and the Cobbler made. The film was directed by filmmaker Kevin Schreck. Its tagline is, "the untold story of the greatest animated film never made." The film premiered in Canada on 4 October 2012 at the Vancouver International Film Festival.

Animator Richard Williams attempts to finish his masterpiece, a long-term vanity project called The Thief and the Cobbler . Though he did not participate in the making of the film, archival footage of Williams is combined with interviews with his co-workers.

Drew Taylor of IndieWire called the film "a heartbreaking account" and a "Herculean accomplishment". [1] The Globe and Mail rated the film 3.5/4 stars and called the film "gripping". [2] Jeff Shannon of The Seattle Times rated the film 3.5/4 stars and described it as "engrossing" and "surprisingly suspenseful". [3]

Persistence of Vision is a 2012 documentary film based on Richard Williams ' experiences trying to get The Thief and the Cobbler made. The film was directed by filmmaker Kevin Schreck. Its tagline is, "the untold story of the greatest animated film never made." The film premiered in Canada on 4 October 2012 at the Vancouver International Film Festival.

Animator Richard Williams attempts to finish his masterpiece, a long-term vanity project called The Thief and the Cobbler . Though he did not participate in the making of the film, archival footage of Williams is combined with interviews with his co-workers.

Drew Taylor of IndieWire called the film "a heartbreaking account" and a "Herculean accomplishment". [1] The Globe and Mail rated the film 3.5/4 stars and called the film "gripping". [2] Jeff Shannon of The Seattle Times rated the film 3.5/4 stars and described it as "engrossing" and "surprisingly suspenseful". [3]

Гладиатор (2000)
# 46 on IMDb Top Rated Movies »

Michelle Williams »
# 72 on STARmeter

A look at the first years of Pixar Animation Studios - from the success of "Toy Story" and Pixar's promotion of talented people, to the building of its East Bay campus, the company's ... See full summary  »

The story of the Disney Renaissance, an incredibly prolific, successful and prestigious decade lasting from 1984 to 1994 that saw the fallen Walt Disney Animation Studios' unexpected progressive triumphant return to excellence.

Sting 's wife Trudie Styler documents the turbulent bureaucracy both Sting and the filmmakers went through in order to complete Похождения императора (2000), a Disney film that underwent extensive storyline changes from start to finish.

Taking place 2,400 years in the past, Prologue depicts a brutal battle between two teams of Spartan and Athenian warriors.

Let's all be honest, animation works like magic. You're a wizard of the page. How does animation work though? Let's break it down into some detail so we can understand what dark arts we are drawing upon.

The prevailing idea for a long time was the persistence of vision was the reason animation worked. While it is partially true, now we understand that there is more in play than simply just persistence of vision.

Persistence of vision is the fact that your eyes seem to retain an image for a split second after the image has vanished from your view. It's kind of like when you look out a window on a sunny day and close your eyes real tight, you can still kind of see the basic shapes of what you were looking at. It's not that same exact principle since that has to do with light more and your retinas readjusting to the dark, but it's the same idea.

Remember those old bird and cage toys? Like this one that Johnny Depp's mom shows him in Sleepy Hollow.  Those are called thaumatropes. Don't worry that won't be on the final exam, those work by the principle of persistence of vision. Your eye retains that there is both a bird and a cage slightly after they switch images, causing the illusion that the bird is inside the cage when really they are two separate pictures.

Now in animation, we have a series of images that string together to make a movement. For a long time, people presumed it was because of the persistence of vision, that our mind would retain the frame for a split second as we blended it with the new frame to create the movement.

So you know when you're walking down the street and you blink and you're like; "Whoa, where did everything go?!" No? Well, that's good cause that'd be a huge pain and very scary. Luckily for us, our brain ignores all of those blinks so we don't constantly see a flash of black every few seconds.  A film camera works very similarly to a human eye , it has a rolling shutter that blocks out the picture while the image is changing. That way we only see the full frames and not any weird half frames as the film advances.

Our eyes offer one of the five specialized means by which our mind is able to form a picture of the world. The eye is a remarkable instrument, having certain characteristics to help us process the light we see in such a way that our mind can create meaning from it.  

Take the motion picture, the scanning of an image for television, and the sequential reproduction of the flickering visual images they produce. These work in part because of an optical phenomenon that has been called “persistence of vision” and its psychological partner, the  phi  phenomenon—the mental bridge that the mind forms to conceptually complete the gaps between the frames or pictures. 

Although the term  persistence of vision  has come to be seen as inadequate to fully describe this very complex physiological reality, it remains a standard expression and, as such, it serves as a useful metaphor. 

In effect, the process we know as persistence of vision plays a role in keeping the world from going pitch black every time we blink our eyes. Whenever light strikes the retina, the brain retains the impression of that light for about a 10th to a 15th of a second (depending on the brightness of the image, retinal field of view, and color) after the source of that light is removed from sight. This is due to a prolonged chemical reaction. As a result, the eye cannot clearly distinguish changes in light that occur faster than this retention period. The changes either go unnoticed or they appear to be one continuous picture to the human observer. 

Television, too, uses a complicated form of intermittent light impulses to literally build the picture we see. If an image can be built up quickly enough, the eye will be unaware that this process is even occurring. American television actually transmits and recreates 30 complete images per second to give the illusion of a single continuous picture. 

Biologists tell us that the eye does not function to  replicate  the world we come in contact with but instead to sense, process and encode the motion, patterns and colors of the light we see into something our mind will interpret. We process this data in connection with information coming from all the other organs that respond to our environment, thus combining the new data with similar information already stored in our memory. As a result, no two people see anything exactly alike. 




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